COVID-19 UPDATE

 

To our patients, friends and family:

My highest priority continues to be the health and well-being of Newtown Dental Arts patients and team members. As a result of the evolving impact of the COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) national and state emergency declarations, and in compliance with the requests made by State and Federal Administrations, I will be restricting the dental care provided to patients to *only* emergency care, for the next two weeks.

This decision was not made lightly. After considering advice from fellow healthcare professionals, the American Dental Association and the Center for Disease Control, our team believes that we are acting in the best interest of our close-knit community. We must all do our part to “flatten the curve” and mitigate the risk of person-to-person contact, by staying home.

During this time, I will be available for patients who experience a true dental emergency. Please call our office at 215-860-4141 and listen to the prompts to be connected to the emergency paging system.

If your upcoming appointment has been cancelled, you will receive direct communication from our Patient Care Team, via text, email and/or phone call. For non-emergent requests, you may leave a message in our general office voicemail, which will be checked at least once each day. You may also email us at patientcare@newtowndentalarts.com.

We appreciate your patience and understanding during these unprecedented, challenging times. As this is a fluid situation, we continue to monitor the advice of our government, the ADA and CDC and will continue to send updates as necessary.

We hope you will join us in staying home and staying healthy.

Very sincerely,

Dr. Renée Feldsher

 

 

Online Dental Education Library

Our team of dental specialists and staff strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with your teeth and gums. Please use our dental library to learn more about dental problems and treatments available. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, contact us.

If you could have fillings that matched the natural color of your teeth so well that nobody could tell the difference, would you choose them over metal?

We thought so! Both scientific studies and clinical experience have shown that tooth-colored restorations (fillings) are safe, reliable and long-lasting. Plus, they look great.

Metal fillings vs tooth-colored fillings.Not only do tooth-colored fillings offer an aesthetic alternative to “silver” (dental amalgam) fillings that's hard to match — they may also allow for a more conservative treatment method that preserves more of the tooth's structure. When you put these advantages together, it's no wonder some dentists say we're moving toward a “post-amalgam” era.

Tooth-colored fillings are made of a blend, or “composite,” of plastic resins and silica fillers. These substances mimic many of the qualities of natural tooth structure, such as wear-resistance and translucency. Dental composites also help strengthen teeth.

Based on looks alone, it's easy to see why you'd want a tooth-colored restoration in the front of your mouth. But to understand some of the other advantages composite resins offer — even for back teeth — let's look a little closer at the tooth restoration process.

The Process of Filling a Tooth

There are many reasons why a tooth may need to be filled or restored: decay and chipping are two common ones. No matter which material is chosen, the procedure is almost the same. After the area has been anesthetized (usually by a numbing injection), the tooth is “prepared” by removing decay and making it ready for the restoration. Next, the filling material is placed directly into the tooth. Once it has securely bonded to the tooth structure, the process is essentially complete.

Now, here's the difference: In order to achieve a good structural bond with a traditional amalgam filling, it is often necessary to shape the tooth by making a series of “undercuts” that help hold the material in place. This means that some healthy tooth material must be removed, leaving less of the tooth's structure intact. In time, the structurally-weakened tooth can be prone to cracking.

But composite resin fillings don't require undercutting to make a strong union — instead, they form an intimate physical and mechanical bond directly to the prepared tooth. This more conservative treatment may ultimately lead to a better and longer-lasting restoration.

When Can Tooth-Colored Fillings Be Used?

Composite resins are generally appropriate for small to moderate-sized restorations — which encompass the most common types of fillings. They are durable, fracture-resistant, and able to withstand chewing pressure. Depending on how much of the tooth needs restoration, the procedure may be accomplished in just one visit. Alternatively, if a large volume of tooth material must be replaced, a part may be fabricated outside the mouth and later bonded to the tooth.

Whatever the situation, the best way to determine whether tooth-colored fillings are right for you is to come in and consult with us. We can explain the appropriate options and help you select the best way to proceed with treatment. Either way, you'll be able to achieve — and keep — a healthy-looking smile.

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