COVID-19 UPDATE

 

To our patients, friends and family:

My highest priority continues to be the health and well-being of Newtown Dental Arts patients and team members. As a result of the evolving impact of the COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) national and state emergency declarations, and in compliance with the requests made by State and Federal Administrations, I will be restricting the dental care provided to patients to *only* emergency care, for the next two weeks.

This decision was not made lightly. After considering advice from fellow healthcare professionals, the American Dental Association and the Center for Disease Control, our team believes that we are acting in the best interest of our close-knit community. We must all do our part to “flatten the curve” and mitigate the risk of person-to-person contact, by staying home.

During this time, I will be available for patients who experience a true dental emergency. Please call our office at 215-860-4141 and listen to the prompts to be connected to the emergency paging system.

If your upcoming appointment has been cancelled, you will receive direct communication from our Patient Care Team, via text, email and/or phone call. For non-emergent requests, you may leave a message in our general office voicemail, which will be checked at least once each day. You may also email us at patientcare@newtowndentalarts.com.

We appreciate your patience and understanding during these unprecedented, challenging times. As this is a fluid situation, we continue to monitor the advice of our government, the ADA and CDC and will continue to send updates as necessary.

We hope you will join us in staying home and staying healthy.

Very sincerely,

Dr. Renée Feldsher

 

 

Online Dental Education Library

Our team of dental specialists and staff strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with your teeth and gums. Please use our dental library to learn more about dental problems and treatments available. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, contact us.

There are times when a tooth suffers damage (from decay, for example) that is too extensive to be treated with a simple filling — but not extensive enough to need a full-coverage crown. In these cases, the best option for restoring the tooth may be an inlay or onlay.

Inlay, Onlays and Crowns.

Both inlays and onlays are considered “indirect” fillings, meaning that they are fabricated outside the mouth (generally at a dental laboratory), and then bonded to the tooth by the dentist. This is in contrast to a “direct” filling, which is applied directly to the cavity by the dentist in one office visit.

An indirect filling is considered an “inlay” when it fits within the little points or “cusps” of a back (premolar or molar) tooth. It is an “onlay” if it covers one or more of these cusps. Either way, the procedure for placing an inlay or onlay is the same.

How It Works

Getting an inlay or onlay is very much like what you would experience having a crown placed, with one important distinction: less of your natural tooth structure will need to be removed by drilling when you receive an inlay or onlay. When you get a crown, the tooth needs to undergo significant reshaping so that it will fit inside its new covering. Since dentistry's goal is to preserve as much of your natural tooth structure as possible, inlays and onlays may be recommended instead of crowns when a tooth can be restored with this more conservative type of treatment.

The first steps in getting an inlay or onlay are numbing the tooth and surrounding area with a local anesthetic, and then removing the decay. This is done in order to prevent the decay, which is actually a type of infection, from progressing deeper into the tooth.

Once the tooth has been prepared, an impression of it is made (either digitally or with a putty-like material) and sent to the dental laboratory. There, the impression is used to make a model of your tooth for the creation of your inlay/onlay. The final restoration can be made out of gold or a tooth-colored ceramic or resin.

Before you leave the office, a temporary filling will be attached to your tooth to protect it until the permanent restoration is ready. At your second visit, the permanent inlay/onlay will be attached to your tooth with either a resin that hardens when exposed to a special light source, or a type of permanent cement.

Inlays and onlays are strong, long-lasting, and require no greater level of care than any other tooth. Conscientious daily brushing and flossing, and regular professional cleanings at the dental office are all you need to make sure your restoration lasts for years to come.

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